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The Beijing Olympics 2008

The Olympic Games in Beijing 2008 is one of the clearest examples that many people consider sport, politics and the media to be intimately linked despite protests from the International Olympic Committee and other sports movements that they have little responsibility for promoting certain political or social developments in host countries for mega-events.

In the run up to the Beijing Olympics, Play the Game is following some key aspects of the Games as well as furthering the public debate over the significance of the event in sporting, cultural, economic and political terms.

 

THE OLYMPICS IN CHINA - THE PRICE OF THE MEDAL

Already, the forthcoming Olympic Games have become a media event without parallel, though probably not in the way the organisers had envisaged. Across the world, a discussion is now rolling on the relationship between sport and politics, between China and the West, and between gala ceremonies and human rights. To qualify the public debate with facts and improve the understanding of the different interests involved, Play the Game is hosting the seminar The Olympics in China: The Price of the Medal.

The seminar has been made in collaboration with the Danish Institute for Sports Studies and UPDATE, The Danish Journalism Development Institute. Click here to read more.

 

HUMANISTIC OLYMPICS

The Chinese approach to the Olympic games is embodied in the concept 'Humanistic Olympics' - renwen aoyun - which may change how we think about the Olympics in the future. But what does it mean and does it relate to human rights at all? Click here to read more.

 

THE OLYMPICS AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHINA

When the IOC awarded the Olympic Games to China, it took a bet that human rights conditions in the country would improve. Do the Olympic Games or the International Olympic Committee have the ability to be a catalyst for human rights reforms in China, or are Chinese and Western conceptions of human rights so different to be incompatible? Click here to read more.

 

JOURNALISM AND THE BEIJING OLYMPICS

As one of their pledges to the International Olympic Committee, the Chinese authorities pledged free and open access to foreign media during the course of the Olympic Games. Have the Chinese lived up to this promise, or do too many hurdles lie in the way for reporters? What is the situation for Chinese journalists, and how have the Games affected journalistic practices in the host country? Click here to read more.

 


Click on the links in the menu to find introductions to these themes with articles and news from Play the Game and links to relevant information elsewhere.

 

 

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