News articles

  • 26.11.2017 /
    Play the Game 2017 operating under the subtitle "Riding waves of change" will gather around 450 journalists, scientists and sport officials on the 26-30 November in Eindhoven, the Netherlands.
  • Photo: Thomas Søndergaard/Play the Game
    26.11.2017 /
    National sports federations in Europe have better governance than their international counterparts, but they still need more involvement with athletes and the surrounding society, a new survey shows.
  • Photo: Thomas Søndergaard/Play the Game
    26.11.2017 /
    Play the Game 2017 heard a less common narrative on Qatar’s successful 2022 World Cup bid from Hassan Al Thawadi, Secretary General of Committee for Delivery and Legacy.
  • Photo: Thomas Søndergaard/Play the Game
    26.11.2017 /
    The formation of the World Anti Doping Agency in 1999 was hailed as a breakthrough in the global fight against drugs in sport. However, despite nations and sporting bodies agreeing to strict testing and compliance standards, the drug scandals have not gone away. Play the Game 2017 asked if WADA is fit for the future or whether it needs deep-seated reform.
  • Photo: Thomas Søndergaard/Play the Game
    26.11.2017 /
    More than 450 participants will discuss challenges to world sports in the coming days during Play the Game 2017 in Eindhoven. Although it is no longer taboo to speak about the murkier sides of sport such as corruption and doping, the law of silence still rules in many sports, sounded the warning at the opening of the conference.
  • 22.11.2017 /
    Only few days before Play the Game 2017 opens, the conference programme offers a few last minute amendments worth noticing.
  • Photo: Colourbox
    21.11.2017 /
    Amidst all the talk about reform and structural changes in sport, are policy makers paying enough attention to rights of the athletes without whom there would be no sport?
  • Photo: Colourbox
    21.11.2017 /
    Sexual violence against children and young athletes in sport is a problem that has only in recent years started to be published broadly. Yet, a number of brave victims have now started to stand up to tell their stories publicly, and it is obvious that the problem has existed for way too long.

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