Two reports on betting-related match-fixing available

Photo: Thomas Søndergaard/Play the Game

Photo: Thomas Søndergaard/Play the Game

11.11.2014

By Play the Game
As part of the European Commission’s work on fighting match-fixing, two reports have been released. One examines what regulatory frameworks are in place and the other look into how the reporting and sharing of information in the area are carried out.

In their 'Study on risk assessment and management and prevention of conflicts of interest in the prevention and fight against betting-related match fixing in the EU 28', the Dutch ASSER Institute compares the regulatory and self-regulatory frameworks relating to risk assessment and conflict of interest management in the 28 member countries, with the aim of presenting best practice on the field.

The report recommends a ‘4x4 approach’ existing of four elements of collaboration between four key partners:

  1. The sharing of information on suspicious betting patterns between betting companies and sports bodies
  2. The sharing of information between betting operators and national gambling regulators. Agreeing to share information with gambling operators should be a condition for a betting operator getting a license
  3. A sports betting integrity unit attached to the national gambling operator to analyse the gathered information
  4. A clear process for determining whether there is evidence of criminal activity

Funding for the establishment if the above approach should come from sports and the gambling industry the report suggests.

A linked network of national platforms
The second study, 'Study on sharing of information and reporting of suspicious betting activity in the EU 28', authored by Oxford Research and VU Amsterdam, focuses on regulation of information collection, storage and sharing in the EU member countries also including self-regulatory approaches led by the betting industry.

According to the report, barriers to information sharing in the betting related area exist both legally and practically.

Legal barriers for information sharing can be due to interpretations of data protection laws, which can differ from country to country within the EU. There can also be reluctance to cooperation and information sharing between organisations on different mandates and different sets of incentives.

By the establishment of a linked network of National Platforms, some of the barriers that the report identifies to exist in information sharing across borders could be solved. This network is suggested established by the EU.

“The National Platform will provide a single point of entry to relevant authorities in each country,” the report says, suggesting that it will also limit the number of actors involved as well as streamline the coordination and sharing of information between countries.

The two studies are carried out as a contribution to the preparation of the 'Commission Recommendation on best practices in the prevention and combatting of betting-related match-fixing'.

Download the reports here:

 
 

Study on risk assessment and management and prevention of conflicts of interest in the prevention and fight against betting-related match fixing in the EU 28

Study on sharing of information and reporting of suspicious betting activity in the EU 28

Press release from the European Commission

 

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