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Objectives

As of January 1 2011, Play the Game is run by the Danish Institute for Sports Studies (Idan), an independent institution set up by the Danish Ministry of Culture. 

Idan's objectives are as follows:

Mission
The objectives of the Danish Institute for Sports Studies are

  • to establish a general overview of and insight into academic and other forms of research within the fields of sports and non-formal education nationally as well as internationally

  • to analyse the implications and perspectives of policy initiatives within the fields of sports and non-formal education

  • to initiate public debate on key issues regarding non-formal education and Danish and international sports politics

  • to organise the international Play the Game conference at suitable intervals for a target group of Danish and international journalists, academic researchers and sports officials to address current issues in sports politics

  • to strengthen the ethical foundations of sport and work to improve democracy, transparency and freedom of speech in international sports through the Play the Game conference and other activities

  • to establish and develop a Danish Institute for Non-formal Education with an independent research and communication profile

Vision
The Danish Institute for Sports Studies aims to contribute to a comprehensive and nuanced debate at a political level about the development of sport and the formulation of sports strategies as well as the field of non-formal education.

To meet this objective, the institute should

  • raise awareness and create insights into the links between sports, non-formal education, culture, health and society at a local, national and international level and thereby contribute to building a comprehensive understanding of sport

  • raise questions in the sports political debate and encourage a free, independent, transparent and fair debate on the affairs of sport and its development locally, nationally and internationally as well as on the field of non-formal education

  • create an overview of and provide perspectives on current research and debates  about sport, sports politics and non-formal education nationally and internationally and assess the implications of initiatives on the fields of sports politics and non-formal education

  • undertake research, write reports and do evaluations of issues of importance for the development of sport and the field of non-formal education

  • communicate insights and knowledge to the public in an accessible and relevant manner that  gives journalists, academic researchers and decision-makers inspiration and tools to work with cultural, social and economic aspects of sport and non-formal education

  • create networks and partnerships across national borders and professional boundaries to facilitate debates on the challenges that arise from a globalised sport and media world

Values
The work at the institute will be based on 

Independence: The work of the institute must not be influenced by political considerations or interest groups. This is the only way to ensure that the work of the institute will be credible and above reproach. 

Professionalism: The work of the institute must be based on high standards of academic excellence combined with the ability to communicate well. That is the only way to ensure the necessary degree of fairness. 

Relevance: The work of the institute must be of importance to key actors in sport and in non-formal education as well as for the development of both fields. That is the only way to ensure that the work of the institute is topical and dynamic. 

Impact: The institute must be capable of presenting the findings of its work to the public in accessible and interesting ways. That is the only way to ensure that the institute can have an impact on the  agenda regarding sports politics and non-formal education. 

Tasks
The work of the institute must be based on high quality journalism or research within the social sciences but when relevant it can also draw on research from other forms of science (humanistic studies, medical and natural sciences). The institute will have the opportunity to use both interdisciplinary and multi-disciplinary approaches. 

The institute must be capable of summing up, processing and communicating current and relevant Danish and international research, and at short notice undertaking impact analyses of current ideas and initiatives in the areas of sports politics and non-formal education. At the same time, the institute must have the capacity to undertake its own research projects, investigations and evaluations - either on its own initiative or as part of commissioned work. 

At suitable intervals - currently thought to be every second year - the institute will host the international Play the Game conference for a Danish and international target group of journalists, academic researchers and sports officials. The programme should address a number of current sports political issues. The international Play the Game conference can be supplemented with conferences, seminars and course activities at regional, national or local levels. 

The institute should strive for close dialogue and cooperation with actors within sport, relevant public institutions, university degree programmes within sport and other relevant research institutions. 

In the period 2013-2015 the institute must establish and develop a new Institute for Non-formal Education in close dialogue and cooperation with actors in the field of non-formal education. This new institute should cover non-formal adult education in particular, including evening schools, folk high schools, people’s university as well as ideological and publicly-engaging children and youth activities cf. Law on Non-formal Education (including in particular scouts, political and religious youth organisations),

The Danish Institute for Non-formal Education should perform the following tasks in particular:

  • produce and disseminate knowledge with a view to adding knowledge on practice and relevant developing needs in non-formal educational associations and on community level

  • pursue, discuss and provide recommendations to the development and documentation of non-formal education activities, including the production of supplementing statistics, evaluations and research

  • contribute to the enhancement of the collaboration between non-formal educational associations and other stakeholders including public actors

  • ensure the dissemination of its activities including activities aimed at continuing training, development of courses and activities aimed at relevant groups and strategic partnerships with relevant partners

  • ensure the coordination and cooperation with existing institutes within the area including Danish Institute for Free Schools

  • host a perspective forum as minimum on a yearly basis where main actors within non-formal education will be given the possibility to comment on the work of the Danish Institute for Non-formal Education and to put forward suggestions and inspiration for future efforts

Structure
The Danish Institute for Sports Studies is an independent research centre set up by the Danish Ministry of Culture. 

The Danish Institute for Sport Studies is directed by a board that consists of eight members. The Minister of Culture appoints the chairman, the deputy chairman and six other members to have overall responsibility for the institute and its activities. As part of the process of appointing board members, the Minister ensures that the board represents the values expressed in the institute's objectives and that its members collectively have competencies in the areas of Danish and international sports politics, non-formal education, media and sports research. 

The board and the director cooperate on developing a multi-annual plan of action for the institute. The action plan should identify relevant target areas for the activities of the institute. 

Based on recommendations from the administration, the board will appoint a Programme Committee for the international Play the Game conference consisting of at least seven Danish and international experts. The role of the Programme Committee is to give advice on conference themes and speakers. The Programme Committee is also responsible for evaluating the conference. 

To ensure a balance between continuity and variation in the conference programme, some members of the Programme Committee will be replaced after each conference. 

Funding
The Danish Ministry of Culture provides the institute with a basic grant. The grant should cover research and analysis projects identified in the plan of action for the institute. The grant should also cover the basic costs of running the institute, such as rent, administration, information and documentation, updating and processing national and international research, communication, conference secretariat, etc. 

In addition, the institute can procure income from commissioned work and other forms of revenue-funded activities.

The Danish Institute for Non-formal Education is established with a separate grant from the Danish Ministry of Culture of a total of six million DKK covering the period 2013-2015 after which the institute is expected to be self-sustainable. At the beginning of 2015 the Danish Youth Council (DUF), Danish Adult Education Association (DFS), Danish Institute for Sports Studies and the Danish Ministry of Culture will co-produce an assessment of the efforts of the Danish Institute for Non-formal Education and of the perspectives in keeping the initiative under the management of the Danish Institute for Sports Studies.

The resources for the Danish Institute for Non-formal Education are pre-allocated through the elaboration of yearly workplans with specification of contemplated efforts, projects et.al. to be approved by the board. With offset in the annual report to the board, the Danish Institute for Non-formal Education will prepare a report on its activities in the non-formal education area, which is to be presented at the perspective forum. DFS and DUF must be represented at the Danish Institute for Non-formal Education perspective forum.

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